Immigration Reform 101 : Unmasking S.744

A video that takes a closer look at the main provisions of this bill: status, militarization and interior enforcement. The video focuses on the so-called path to citizenship.
More info: http://whoseimmigrationreform.com/

en espanol:

¿Qué onda con la Reforma Migratoria?La Reforma Migratoria : Desenmascarando la S.744 Proyecto de ley del senado (S.744):
Militarización, Estatus de RPI , Enforzamiento Policial

Mas info: http://whoseimmigrationreform.com/

Time to Rethink Immigration Detention

César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández
Border Wars, from http://nacla.org/blog/2013/3/27/time-rethink-immigration-detention
March 27, 2013

Last month’s sequester-related release of immigrants from immigration detention centers brought praise from immigrants’ rights advocates and impassioned criticism from conservative politicians. House Speaker John Boehner decried the decision to “let criminals go free,” and chairman of the House Judiciary Committee Bob Goodlatte added, “By releasing criminal immigrants onto the streets, the administration is needlessly endangering American lives.”

Photo Credit: International Business Times

Photo Credit: International Business Times

It was no surprise that the White House quickly distanced itself from last month’s events. The Obama Administration has expanded the immigration detention population like no other. Last year’s 429,247 detainees represent the highest number of people ever detained in a single year by the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency, the Department of Homeland Security unit responsible for detaining people who are waiting to learn whether they will be allowed to remain in the United States. With a population of this size under its control, ICE is the largest imprisoning agency in the country and spends about $2 billion a year on immigrant detention.
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Cuéntame Releases New 30-Minute “Immigrants for Sale” Video About Private Prison Industry

As more and more details are being reported about GEO Group’s private prison and immigrant detention business, Cuéntame has now produced an extended 30-minute video of its’ original viral “Immigrants for Sale” production. For more information about this story, which has gotten very little attention from the U.S. mainstream media, you can visit the official “Immigrants for Sale” site.

Deportation’s forgotten children, from the L.A. Times

The Help Separated Families Act will help end the suffering that our broken system causes children and immigrant parents who are torn apart.

According to the Applied Research Center's report "Shattered Families," at least 5,000 children of immigrants live in U.S. foster care because their parents were detained or deported. Above: Demonstrators describing themselves as "Obama Orphans," or children whose parents have been deported, are seen outside the White House in 2010. (Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images / February 8, 2013)

According to the Applied Research Center’s report “Shattered Families,” at least 5,000 children of immigrants live in U.S. foster care because their parents were detained or deported. Above: Demonstrators describing themselves as “Obama Orphans,” or children whose parents have been deported, are seen outside the White House in 2010. (Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images / February 8, 2013)

By Karen Bass and Lucille Roybal-Allard
February 11, 2013

As Congress looks toward meaningful immigration reform, we must take care not to neglect one of the most heartbreaking problems within the current, broken system: what happens to children when their parents or guardians are deported.

Currently, according to the Applied Research Center’s report “Shattered Families,” at least 5,000 children of immigrants live in U.S. foster care because their parents were detained or deported. If the current trends hold, the center estimates, 15,000 more children over the next five years will be ripped away from their mothers and fathers as a result of federal immigration enforcement actions.

In the wake of immigration arrests, law enforcers often don’t allow detained immigrant parents the opportunity to make proper arrangements for the care of their children. Kids can come home from school, only to find their mothers and fathers gone.

When a child enters the foster-care system, detained parents often have little input into plans for their children’s care, since the hearings and proceedings that determine those arrangements tend to take place far from the detention centers where immigrants are held. Once parents have been taken into custody or deported, caseworkers report, it is difficult for children to maintain contact with them.
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